busy sunday

While my DH doesn’t think we should heat up the house by canning during the summer, had to inform him that it is during the summer months that most of the harvest starts to come in. Its also when the market has sales on produce and even meats!  Since we don’t raise our own chicken and beef, have to take advantage of that on their schedule not ours.

Also, my canner isn’t very big, so while some people can do more than a dozen pints, I’m limited to 8  pints.  This was two packages of boneless chicken breasts  in 5 pints and 3 pints of beef.  another package of chicken breasts were sliced for the dehydrator, as was some of the beef.  All the tendony, fatty parts of both became dog food.  with boneless, skinless, chicken breasts at $1.67/lb, you know I’ll be smiling when I grab one of these jars for making chicken – something – in the winter months.

Dug up one of the garden beds this weekend as a mole has come to live with me and was eating my produce almost faster than we were!  Certainly did in some plants that would have yielded many meals through the season and beyond!  Still haven’t gotten rid of this creature, so now the real goal is to track down how its getting in and out so it can hide and come back!  While the bed was dug, could reach over to the stand of white sage that was around the perimeter.  Trimmed that out, then cut down the volunteer Mugwort (artemisia vulgaris), and trimmed some lavender.  Not a lot, but was able to make 6 nice sage and lavender wands, plus three small mugwort ones.  This is not a really smelly sage when it burns, so it should be nice with the lavender.

Left it all to dry in the greenhouse. Next to them is the old cheap Ronco dehydrator that had gone bad. It was getting too hot, so ripped out the electric element and let it sit in the heat and sunshine. Take 2 days to make jerky, instead of the one it would take with an electrical assist, but its a lot cheaper to use it this way!

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